Clove Bud Essential Oil: Traditional Comfort for a Sore Throat or Toothache

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If you glance through your collection of spices, you probably have a tin of whole or powdered cloves. This spice has an earthy smell and taste that is instantly recognizable; however, most people only use cloves to make potpourri or to decorate their holiday ham. Clove bud oil has been used as an herbal remedy for ages. Once you see the benefits of this humble evergreen bud, you will want to stock some in your medicine cabinet:

What is a clove?


Cloves are small buds that are harvested from the clove evergreen, which is native to Indonesia and other parts of Asia. For centuries, Asian cultures used the pungent bud for medicine and cooking. Indian and Chinese cuisines still incorporate cloves into their favorite dishes.

It can be used whole or ground. Clove buds, leaves, and stems can provide essential oils that are used for different purposes. Since oil from the buds is milder than oil from stems and leaves, it is the first choice for medicine.

What is clove bud oil?


Among the plethora of spices that Eastern nations exported, cloves became a popular medicinal spice. The ancient Romans and Greeks were some of the first Westerners to grind up the clove buds and extract their beneficial oil. They often kept little vials of it to sweeten their breath, or to ease an aching tooth. Clove bud oil was often used in the Middle Ages and continued in popularity to our modern times.

After several studies and clinical trials over the years, medical researchers agree that clove bud oil can be beneficial for oral health. It is often an active ingredient in toothpaste and mouthwash and can fight oral issues, such as painful gums, mouth sores, and cavity pain. As a gargle, it is used with other essential oils for sore throat.

What are some other uses of clove bud oil?


Extensive studies have demonstrated the impressive properties of this oil. It effectively combats harmful microbes, like viruses and fungi. Clove bud oil is a powerful antiseptic and even has stimulant properties. Some proponents believe that this oil may be an aphrodisiac. Here are other common uses for this essential oil:

• Fighting infections: When applied topically, clove bud oil can stave off infections in cuts and other wounds. It also effectively fights fungal infections, such as athlete’s foot. 

• Digestive aid: Cloves can help people who have indigestion. The oil can soothe the digestive tract and reduce nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. It has also been used to treat hiccups, gas, and motion sickness.

• Skin Issues: Clove bud oil combats several problems of the skin. As an antiseptic, it can kill the bacteria that cause acne breakouts, or the viruses that produce warts. It hydrates and tightens the skin, which can minimize wrinkles or sag.

• Respiratory problems: It has expectorant properties, which mean that it benefits any issues with the lungs or sinuses. This includes colds, coughing, bronchitis, sinus infections, and asthma. Clove bud is top-rated among essential oils for sore throat. During epidemics of tuberculosis, doctors found that clove bud oil eased some of their patients’ symptoms.

• Muscle pain: When this essential oil is mixed with a carrier oil, it makes a useful massage oil to relax aching muscles. The main component of clove bud oil is eugenol, which can stimulate nerve endings and reduce inflammation. It can also relieve stress and exhaustion.

What are some other benefits?


• Bug repellant: Instead of relying on dangerous chemicals to combat annoying insects, a mixture of clove bud oil and citrus oil will do the trick. Humans love the smell, but the bugs hate it and stay away.

• Perfumes: Clove bud oil has been a favorite perfume ingredient for centuries. It blends well with floral or earthy notes, with its pleasant aroma.

• Bath ingredient: Many soap manufacturers include this essential oil not only for its delightful scent but also for its antibacterial properties. Clove bud oil is a common ingredient in shampoo and hair care products.

• Natural flavoring: This oil is used as a subtle flavor in many food and beverage products.

While clove bud oil has many suggested benefits, you should consult your doctor before using it for any condition. It may not be safe to use with certain medications or health conditions. Tell your doctor about any medicines and herbal supplements you are taking. Clove bud oil can be found at most health food stores or online and should be diluted with a carrier oil before use.
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